Severe weather likely for Harvey County late afternoon

By Adam Strunk

Severe weather is highly likely in Harvey County, and it’s expected to roll through between 4-6 p.m. today.
That’s according to the National Weather Service. The NWS expects the weather to bring a risk of large hail, damaging winds, and tornados.
“We think you’re going to see severe weather,” Scott Smith, National Weather Service Meteorologist, said. “Whether it goes over one person’s house or goes 5-10 miles away, somewhere in Harvey County is going to see severe weather. Whether it’s baseball or dime-size hail it’s hard to say.”
Storms are expected to move northeast at 35-45 miles per hour.
Smith said the severity of the storms and hazards they produce will depend on how they form in the next few hours.
He said if the storms form a line, winds, and hail would be the main hazards, though storm lines to produce tornadoes and those would remain a risk.
If instead individual storm cells or supercells formed, then the risk of strong long-track tornadoes would increase. These are the most damaging tornadoes that stay on the ground for long periods and can grow into a larger wedge shape.
“The deal is all the ingredients are there for a big severe weather day,” he said.
Scott said while it wasn’t possible to pinpoint the exact location of storms, it was important for people to be prepared, and tune in to local tv stations, or other sources of information on the weather.
Harvey County is listed as an area of high risk. The highest risk of severe weather is to the south in parts of Sedgwick County southward to the Oklahoma border.
The NWS recommends people have a plan for where they would take shelter, as well as have an emergency kit prepared.
That includes water, non-perishable food, first aid, and a flashlight, Severe weather is highly likely in Harvey County, and it’s expected to roll through between 4-6 p.m. today.
That’s according to the National Weather Service. The NWS expects a risk of large hail, damaging winds, and tornados.
“We think you’re going to see severe weather,” Scott Smith National Weather Service Meteorologist said. “Whether it goes over one person’s house or goes 5-10 miles away, somewhere in Harvey County is going to see severe weather. Whether it’s baseball or dime-size hail it’s hard to say.”
Storms are expected to move northeast at 35-45 miles per hour.Smith said the severity of the storms and hazards they produce will depend on how they form in the next few hours.
He said if the storms form a line, winds, and hail would be the main hazards, though storm lines to produce tornadoes and those would remain a risk.
If instead individual storm cells or supercells formed, then the risk of strong long-track tornadoes would increase. These are the most damaging tornadoes that stay on the ground for long periods and can grow into a larger wedge shape.
“The deal is all the ingredients are there for a big severe weather day,” he said.
Scott said while it wasn’t possible to pinpoint the exact location of storms, it was important for people to be prepared, and tune in to local tv stations, or other sources of information on the weather.
Harvey County is listed as an area of high risk. The highest risk of severe weather is to the south in parts of Sedgwick County southward to the Oklahoma border.
The NWS recommends people have a plan for where they would take shelter, and an emergency kit prepared.
That includes water, non-perishable food, first aid, a flashlight, batteries, a weather radio, a whistle or something to signal,  and a wrench or pliers to turn off utilities if needed.
and have multiple ways of being alerted in case of severe weather, such as text alerts, a weather radio, a television tuned into local meteorologists, access to an internet site, or a friend or family member who can call them. They can also listen for outdoor tornado sirens. It should be noted that the sirens are intended to be heard by those out of doors and people indoors might not always be able to hear them.
and batteries, a weather radio, a whistle or something to signal,  and a wrench or pliers to turn off utilities if needed.
and have multiple ways of being alerted in case of severe weather, such as text alerts, a weather radio, a television tuned into local meteorologists, access to an internet site, or a friend or family member who can call them. They can also listen for outdoor tornado sirens. It should be noted that the sirens are intended to be heard by those out of doors and people indoors might not always be able to hear them.

USD 373 announced it would cancel all sports and afterschool activities for Monday.

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